Tag Archives: detroit

Where Is my 341 Meeting Held if I Live in the Eastern District of Michigan?

The location of your 341 Meeting of Creditors hearing depends both upon your county of residence and whether you are filing a Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy in Michigan.

Click here to read more about 341 meeting location in the Eastern District of Michigan on the new Michigan Bankruptcy Blog of Michigan bankruptcy attorneys The Hilla Law Firm, PLLC.

Wherever you are located in Michigan, if you are considering filing for bankruptcy, please feel free to contact me at (866) 674-2317 or john@hillalaw.com to schedule a free, initial consultation.

Why Reaffirming Mortgages Is a Very Bad Idea

Guest Post by Michael Goldstein, attorney in Massachusetts.

You are in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy to eliminate your overwhelming debt, not to put yourself back on the hook for it.

Click here to read more about why reaffirming mortgages is a very bad idea in a guest post by Massachusetts Attorney Michael Goldstein on the new Michigan Bankruptcy Blog of Michigan Bankruptcy Attorneys The Hilla Law Firm, PLLC.

 

 

Can I Pay Back-Rent in a Chapter 13 Bankruptcy Plan?

Back rents can be repaid in full in a Chapter 13 bankruptcy in order to stop an eviction and preserve your right to remain in rental housing.

Click here to read more about back rent in Chapter 13 bankruptcy on the new Michigan Bankruptcy Blog of Michigan bankruptcy attorneys The Hilla Law Firm, PLLC.

If you are a southeast Michigan resident and are considering filing for bankruptcy, please feel free to contact me at (866) 674-2317 or john@hillalaw.com to schedule a free, initial consultation.

Why You Shouldn’t Worry about your Chapter 7 Bankruptcy 341 Meeting of Creditors

The Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 bankruptcy 341 Meeting of Creditors is usually the only hearing you will have to appear for in a typical bankruptcy process. Generally speaking, there is no reason to feel stressed or nervous about this hearing in advance.

Click here to read more about the 341 Meeting of Creditors and why it is nothing to fear on the new Michigan Bankruptcy Blog of Michigan bankruptcy attorneys The Hilla Law Firm, PLLC.

If you are a southeast Michigan resident considering filing for bankruptcy, please feel free to call me at (866) 674-2317 or email us at john@hillalaw.com to schedule a free, initial consultation.

Can I Lower my Salary or Wages to Pass the Chapter 7 Bankruptcy Means Test if I am Self-Employed?

Some small business owners inquire as to the possibility of artificially lowering their income or taking less wages out of their business prior to filing a bankruptcy petition in order to pass the Chapter 7 means test.

This possibility is fraught with peril for uninformed individuals. Click here to read more about whether one can lower wages to pass the means test in bankruptcy on the new Michigan Bankruptcy Blog of Michigan bankruptcy attorneys The Hilla Law Firm, PLLC.

If you are a southeast Michigan resident and are considering filing for bankruptcy, please contact us at (866) 674-2317 or john@hillalaw.com to schedule a free, initial consultation.

Do I Need to List Every Debt in my Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 Bankruptcy? (Revisited)

I’ve written before on the subject of whether all debts must be listed in a Chapter 7 or a Chapter 13 bankruptcy petition as an answer to the very commonly asked question, “Can I leave my favorite credit card out of the bankruptcy?”

The answer to that question is an easy, “No, you cannot leave a debt out of the bankruptcy; the US Bankruptcy Code requires that all assets and all liabilities (debts) must be listed in either a Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 petition—and treated in a Chapter 13 payment plan one way or another.

However, there are additional reasons why you would want every debt listed, even if you otherwise desired to leave it out of the bankruptcy:

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What Is Chapter 13 Bankruptcy?

Chapter 13 bankruptcy is a “reorganization” bankruptcy rather than a complete liquidation of debt as in a Chapter 7. A Chapter 13 is, basically, a payment plan enforced by the Federal Bankruptcy Court upon all of your creditors, whether the debt is a “dischargeable” debt like a credit card or “non-dischargeable” debt like a child support arrearage or recent income taxes owed. Contrary to popular belief, you are not required to pay back 100% of what you owe to your creditors in a Chapter 13.

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