Tag Archives: foreign property

Can I File for Bankruptcy if I Reside Outside of the United States?

You can file a Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy in Michigan even if you reside or are stationed outside the continental United States.

Click here read more about filing for bankruptcy while living overseas on the new Michigan Bankruptcy Blog of The Hilla Law Firm, PLLC.

If you are a permanent resident of southeast Michigan living abroad and are considering filing for bankruptcy, please contact us at (866) 674-2317 or john@hillalaw.com to schedule a free, initial consultation.

How Much Can my Chapter 7 Banrkuptcy Trustee Can Take from Me?

Most Chapter 7 cases that I handle as a Michigan bankruptcy attorney are “no-asset” bankruptcy cases, meaning that, after I  have exempted the filing individual’s personal assets from the bankruptcy estate created by the filing of the bankruptcy petition, there is nothing left available for the Trustee to liquidate (seize and sell off for cash) and distribute to creditors. In fact, the great majority of Chapter 7 bankruptcy cases filed anywhere are “no-asset” cases of this sort.

However, some cases are “asset” cases that do involve a transfer of assets from the filing individual’s ownership to the creditors whose debts he or she is discharging by way of the Chapter 7 Trustee assigned to the case, whose job is to do just that.

Sometimes, however, a filing individual does have more property or more cash assets in their possession than the exemptions in the Bankruptcy Code allow me to protect. (The exemptions are bits of the Bankruptcy Code statute that allow me to remove up to certain dollar-amounts of certain types of property from that legal “bankruptcy estate” containing otherwise everything the individual owns or is owed at the timing of the filing of the case.) These cases are called “asset” cases.

Usually, the available bankruptcy exemptions are sufficient to protect, if not ALL of somebody’s property, nearly all of it and what the Trustee manages to liquidate and distribute to creditors is less than what the individual owes to their creditors. This is sometimes only a few thousand dollars or less, which may be a small price for the individual to pay to discharge and walk away from tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands of dollars’ worth of debt.

Occasionally, however, the asset liquidated by the Trustee may be quite valuable. On extremely rare occasions, its value may outstrip the total dollar amount owed to the individual’s creditors.

Of course, this is rare because the calculation by the filing individual of the worthwhileness of the bankruptcy’s filing in the first place may be premised upon the fact that they will lose less to the Bankrutpcy Trustee than they owe; if they could simply sell off a valuable asset in order to pay creditors off and avoid bankruptcy in the first place, this is generally preferable. When this occurs, it may be because a filing individual has underestimated the value of an asset, did not realize that they owned it in the first place (e.g., a piece of real estate titled to them by an elderly relative without their knowledge, etc.), or for other reasons.

What happens then?

The Trustee takes a small percentage of the amount distributed to creditors, naturally. After that, however, Section 726 of the Bankruptcy Code governs how creditors are paid and in what order. Creditors are paid by the Trustee according to the timing of the claims that they file with the Bankruptcy Court when the Trustee alerts them that there is an asset to be distributed and according to their classification as “secured” creditors (holding debts with collateral attached to them) or “unsecured” creditors (holding debts with no collateral attached to them). Interest owed is paid as well, under certain circumstances.

However, after all creditors have been paid in accordance with Section 726, the Debtor him- or herself (i.e., the individual who filed the bankruptcy) is then paid.

In other words, you can only pay 100% of what you owe–and no more. If an asset liquidated by the Trustee brings more money to the Trustee for distribution to creditors than those creditors are actually owed, the filing individual will get money back from the Trustee. Eventually. (This distribution process can take months or years to complete.)

If you are a southeast Michigan resident and are considering filing for bankruptcy, please contact me at (866) 674-2317 or john@hillalaw.com to schedule a free, initial consultation.

Should I Do A Short Sale or File for Bankruptcy?

A short sale is almost always an inferior, more complicated, and more expensive way to walk away from underwater property than a bankruptcy surrender of the property.

To read more about the differences between short sales and bankruptcy, click here to read our full post on this subject on the new Michigan Bankruptcy Blog of The Hilla Law Firm, PLLC.

If you are a southeast Michigan resident and are unsure whether to short sale your home or file for bankruptcy, please contact us at (866) 674-2317 or john@hillalaw.com to schedule a free, initial consultation.

Will I Lose my Second Home if I File Chapter 13 Bankruptcy?

Chapter 13 bankruptcies do not require the liquidation of property as Chapter 7 bankruptcies do when property is unable to be exempted. Instead, Chapter 13 bankruptcies are “funded” by the monthly payments filing debtors make to their Chapter 13 Plans. Personal and real property is not subject to liquidation (seizing and selling off of property by the Trustee assigned to a Chapter 7 case by the court) in a Chapter 13 at all.

That does not mean, however, that it is always possible to retain a second home or second piece of real estate in a Chapter 13, particularly if it is a home for which you are making mortgage or other payments.

To read more about rental properties and second homes in Chapter 13 bankruptcy, click here to read our full article on this topic on the new Michigan Bankruptcy Blog of The Hilla Law Firm, PLLC.

If you are a southeast Michigan resident and are considering filing for bankruptcy, please contact us at (866) 674-2317 or john@hillalaw.com to schedule a free, initial consultation.

Should I Transfer Property out of My Name before Filing for Bankruptcy?

It seems like an easy fix, when making attempts to protect assets from creditors prior to deciding to file for bankruptcy to move those assets from your name to a son or daughter or sibling or parent. Often, when people have quit-claimed a home to someone else to protect it from a creditor, they still do not realize, at that point, that they may end up filing for bankruptcy.

This can be a very bad idea.

To read more about transferring property and bankruptcy, click here to read our full post on this topic on the new Michigan Bankruptcy Blog of The Hilla Law Firm, PLLC.

If you are a southeast Michigan resident and are considering filing for bankruptcy, please contact me at (866) 674-2317 or john@hillalaw.com to schedule a free, initial consultation.

Can Bankruptcy Stop My Garnishment?

Consumers who have had difficulty making ends meet often find themselves on the wrong end of a court judgement after their creditors have taken them to court to pursue their debt. These judgements typically result in wage or tax-refund garnishment, often at the expense of the consumer’s ability to pay more pressing necessities, such as rent, a mortgage payment, or medical expenses.

That being the case, the first question I often hear from potential clients is, “Can filing for bankruptcy stop this garnishment?!?” Sometimes the garnishment has already begun, sometimes it is imminent, but it is always a great worry to consumers who do not have a penny to spare from their paychecks when it comes to simply keeping a roof over their children’s heads that month.

Bankruptcy, however, can stop a garnishment cold in its tracks. To read more, click here to read our full article on stopping wage, bank account, or tax return garnishment with a Michigan Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy on the new Michigan bankruptcy blog of The Hilla Law Firm, PLLC.

If you are suffering from an income loss due to garnishment or will soon have your wages or other incoming funds garnished, please contact me us at john@hillalaw.com or (866) 674-2317  to schedule a free, initial consultation, and we will work together to secure the monthly income you depend on.

Do I Need to List Overseas Property in my Bankruptcy Petition?

Even if you are filing for Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy in Michigan, all property must always be disclosed, regardless of whether it is located overseas or you think it unlikely that anyone will discover it independently.

Click here to read more at our website!