Tag Archives: nondischargeable

Are My Co-Signers Affected By Bankruptcy?

Your Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy filing will not negatively affect the credit reports of any co-signers on your debt, but neither it will discharge their joint liability for the debt.

Click here to read more about how co-signers are affected by bankruptcy on the new Michigan bankruptcy blog of Michigan bankruptcy attorney The Hilla Law Firm, PLLC.

If you are a southeast Michigan resident and are interested in discussing your options for bankruptcy, please feel free to contact me at (866) 674-2317 or john@hillalaw.com to schedule a free, initial consultation.

Can I Discharge Attorney Fees in Bankruptcy?

Debts owed to attorneys for services rendered prior to a Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy is usually just as dischargeable as any other unsecured debt.

However, there are situations in which this is not so cut-and-dry.

Click here to read more about whether you can discharge attorney fees in bankruptcy on the new Michigan Bankruptcy Blog of Michigan bankruptcy attorneys The Hilla Law Firm, PLLC.

If you are a southeast Michigan resident considering filing for bankruptcy, please feel free to contact me at (866) 674-2317 to schedule a free initial consultation.

Do I Need to List Every Debt in my Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 Bankruptcy? (Revisited)

I’ve written before on the subject of whether all debts must be listed in a Chapter 7 or a Chapter 13 bankruptcy petition as an answer to the very commonly asked question, “Can I leave my favorite credit card out of the bankruptcy?”

The answer to that question is an easy, “No, you cannot leave a debt out of the bankruptcy; the US Bankruptcy Code requires that all assets and all liabilities (debts) must be listed in either a Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 petition—and treated in a Chapter 13 payment plan one way or another.

However, there are additional reasons why you would want every debt listed, even if you otherwise desired to leave it out of the bankruptcy:

Continue reading

What Is Chapter 13 Bankruptcy?

Chapter 13 bankruptcy is a “reorganization” bankruptcy rather than a complete liquidation of debt as in a Chapter 7. A Chapter 13 is, basically, a payment plan enforced by the Federal Bankruptcy Court upon all of your creditors, whether the debt is a “dischargeable” debt like a credit card or “non-dischargeable” debt like a child support arrearage or recent income taxes owed. Contrary to popular belief, you are not required to pay back 100% of what you owe to your creditors in a Chapter 13.

Continue reading

How Can a Chapter 13 Bankruptcy Help Me Pay Down my Student Loans?

Student loans are not dischargeable in bankruptcy without a court order from the Bankruptcy Court declaring them discharged. But that does not mean that the bankruptcy process offers no solution to dealing with unmanageable student loan collections. Chapter 13 bankruptcy may be able to help you deal with such loan debt.

To read more about Chapter 13 bankruptcy and student loan debt, click here to read our full article on this topic on the new Michigan Bankruptcy Blog of The Hilla Law Firm, PLLC.

If you are a southeast Michigan resident and are considering filing for bankruptcy, please contact me at (866) 674-2317 or john@hillalaw.com to schedule a free, initial consultation.

Can I Discharge a Personal Injury Judgment in Bankruptcy?

A claim or a judgment for an injury that is the result of an “intentional” tort is not dischargeable in Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy, but it may be repaid according to your ability to repay after household expenses are accounted for in a Chapter 13 bankruptcy.

To read more about this topic, please click here to read our full article on personal injury claims and judgments in bankruptcy on the new Michigan Bankruptcy Blog of The Hilla Law Firm, PLLC.

If you are a southeast Michigan resident and are considering filing for bankruptcy, please contact us at (866) 674-2317 or john@hillalaw.com to schedule a free, initial consultation.

What Happens to my Unemployment Benefits if I File Bankruptcy?

Unemployment benefits in Michigan must be disclosed both as a source of income and, as a right to funds, as a personal asset. Unemployment benefits can affect the Chapter 7 bankruptcy means test, which governs your eligibility for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, and it can affect the amount you must pay monthly in a Chapter 13 bankruptcy payment plan.

For more information, read our full post on this topic on the new Michigan bankruptcy blog of The Hilla Law Firm, PLLC here.

If you are a southeast Michigan resident and are considering filing for bankruptcy with an experienced Michigan bankruptcy attorney, please contact us at (866) 674-2317 or john@hillalaw.com to schedule a free, initial consultation.